Center for Political Awareness

House Republicans had Lowest Win Rate on ‘Party Unity’ Votes since 1982

Vote Studies annual tally finds minority Democrats won nearly one-third of divided votes. (Click image for article.)

Photo: From left, Reps. Steve Scalise and Mike Johnson and Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy talk on the House floor during votes to choose a speaker on Jan. 6, 2023. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans last year were the least unified party bloc on legislation in more than four decades, CQ Roll Call’s annual Vote Studies analysis of congressional data found.

And that’s the case even without the multiple ballots it took to pick a speaker at two different points in the year, though those fights were certainly symptomatic.

The data show Republicans had only a 63.7 percent success rate on “party unity votes” or roll calls on bills, amendments and resolutions in which majorities of the two parties were on opposite sides of roll call votes. The metric ignores votes where both parties were overwhelmingly for or against a bill to identify cases where a member’s vote had the most potential to tip the scales one way or another.

The last time a majority party lost more unity votes was when Democrats presided in 1982, the second year of President Ronald Reagan’s first term, and prevailed just 63.5 percent of the time.

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